Chapter 10 exercise

Chapter 10 exercise - Chapter 10 A random phenomenon has...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 10 A random phenomenon has outcomes that we cannot predict but that nonetheless have a regular distribution in very many repetitions. The probability of an event is the proportion of times the event occurs in many repeated trials of a random phenomenon. A probability model for a random phenomenon consists of a sample space S and an assignment of probabilities P . The sample space S is the set of all possible outcomes of the random phenomenon. Sets of outcomes are called events . P assigns a number P ( A ) to an event A as its probability . Any assignment of probability must obey the rules that state the basic properties of probability : 1. 0 ≤ P ( A ) ≤ 1 for any event A . 2. P ( S ) = 1. 3. Addition rule: Events A and B are disjoint if they have no outcomes in common. If A and B are disjoint , then P ( A or B ) = P ( A ) + P ( B ). 4. For any event A , P ( A does not occur) = 1 − P ( A ). When a
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

Chapter 10 exercise - Chapter 10 A random phenomenon has...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online