tutorial - How To LaTeX Adam Blank Contents 2 Contents A 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How To LaTeX Adam Blank January 16, 2011
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Contents 2 Contents 1 What is L A T E X? 3 2 Math Mode 3 3 Some L A T E X Quirks and Misconceptions 4 3.1 Whitespace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.2 Escape Characters? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.3 “Quotes” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.4 ¡ ¿ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 How Do I Make that Symbol? 6 4.1 Basic Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.2 Logic Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.3 Set Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.4 Sequences, Summations, and Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.5 Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.6 Piecewise Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.7 Still Can’t Find It? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5 Some Useful Environments 8 5.1 Centering Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.2 Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.3 Equation Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.4 a, b, c, 1, 2, 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.5 Bullet Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.6 Custom Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.7 Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5.8 Code and WYSIWYG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 6 Using the Homework Template 12
Image of page 2
1 What is L A T E X? 3 1 What is L A T E X? L A T E X is a programming language that is often used in technical fields like Computer Science, Mathe- matics, Chemistry, and Physics to typeset documents. It is particularly useful to easily typeset math (like ∅ ⊆ N ) and chemical formulae (like H 2 O). Unfortunately, L A T E X has a non-trivial learning curve associated with it. This document is intended to lessen your pain in learning how to easily typeset beautiful documents for the rest of your technical career. It is this author’s belief that once you learn how to use L A T E X, editors like Microsoft Word become obsolete, even for documents like English papers. 2 Math Mode One of the most useful things that L A T E X offers is the so-called “Math Mode.” Let’s just begin with an example. If you type the following snippet of code: 1 Let $M$ be the number of moons in the Universe, and let $E$ be the number of 2 moons Earth has. We know from Elementary School that $E=1$, but what can we 3 say about $M$? Since Earth is a part of the Universe, we know that $M \geq E$. 4 Furthermore, Jupiter has at least one moon; so, $M > E$. L A T E X parses it as: Let M be the number of moons in the Universe, and let E be the number of moons Earth has. We know from Elementary School that E = 1, but what can we say about M ? Since Earth is a part of the Universe, we know that M E . Furthermore, Jupiter has at least one moon; so, M > E . Isn’t that neat? The ’s allow us to seamlessly switch between using Math and English. Sometimes, however, we want to isolate the math to display how important it is. This L A T E X mode is called “Display Mode” and is just as easy to use. Instead of a single , just double them up. 1 Here’s an example: 1 Now that we have determined that $M > E$, we would like to find a simple 2 unification result for physics. To do this, we must recall Newton’s famous 3 formula: $$F = ma$$ 4 You see, once we realize its significance, the rest is all simple arithmetic. And the output: Now that we have determined that M > E , we would like to find a simple unification result for physics. To do this, we must recall Newton’s famous formula: F = ma You see, once we realize its significance, the rest is all simple arithmetic.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern