ECON4177-001_Fall09 - ECONOMICS 4177: HISTORY OF ECONOMIC...

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ECONOMICS 4177: HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Fall 2009 MW 12:30-1:45 Davis COURSE: History of Economic Thought COURSE DESCTIPTION: ECON 4177. History of Economic Thought. (W) (3) (3G) Prerequisites: ECON 1201 and 1202. History of economics as a science and the evolution of theories of value, distribution and employment. Review of the works of Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, Thorstein Veblen, and John Maynard Keynes. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The History of Economic Thought course reviews the major ideas and theories of political philosophers and economists. In particular, it examines the contributions of earlier philosophies and economists to our current level of economic knowledge. The History of Economic Thought course's main objective is to develop an understanding of the evolution of modern economics. METHODOLOGY: All important concepts will be presented in class. Class is a combination of lecture and discussion. Students are encouraged to participate regularly in discussions. INSTRUCTOR: Young Davis OFFICE: 217-B Friday Building PHONE and E-Mail: (704) 687-7684 wydavis@uncc.edu OFFICE HOURS: MW 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., 1:45 – 2:00 p.m., and by appointment REQUIRED TEXT: New Ideas from Dead Economics, An Introduction to Modern Economic Thought , 3r d Edition , by Todd G. Buchholz. ATTENDANCE:
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2011 for the course ECON 7125 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at James Madison University.

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ECON4177-001_Fall09 - ECONOMICS 4177: HISTORY OF ECONOMIC...

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