Differentiated Learning

Differentiated Learning - Differentiated Learning EDU673...

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Differentiated Learning Instructor James Youngs Differentiated Learning Everyone is diverse and learns in different ways. Not every student is the same. Established on this knowledge, differentiated instruction applies a method to teaching and learning that gives students numerous options and opportunities for compelling in information and making sense of ideas. Differentiated instruction is a teaching theory based on the principle and idea that instructional tactics should contrast and be adapted in relative to individual and diverse students in classrooms (Tomlinson, 2001). To differentiate instruction is to distinguish learners' unpredictable and varying background information, enthusiasm, language, preferences in learning and securities; and to respond quickly. Differentiated instruction is a procedure to education and knowledge for students of opposing capabilities in the same class. The intent of differentiating instruction is to
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make the most of each student's growth and discrete success by gathering each student where he Differentiated instruction mixes constructivist knowledge theories, learning styles, and brain development with investigation on impelling issues of learner readiness, interest and intelligence preferences toward students’ motivation, engagement, and academic growth within schools (Anderson, 2007). According to educational psychologist Kathie Nunley, differentiated instruction became a vital part of US educator's repertoire as the make-up of the overall classroom moved from homogeneous groupings of students prior to the 1970s to the ever growing variety of learners seen in the assorted classroom make-up in the last 40 years (Nunley, 2006). By using differentiated instruction, educators can meet all individual student needs and help every student meet and exceed established standards (Levy, 2008). According to Tomlinson (as cited by Rebora, 2008), the apparent necessity intended for differentiated instruction defamations in the fact that students differ in so many ways and student populations are flattering more academically diverse. Probabilities are appealing that the leaning of varied student populations will last throughout our lifetimes. A student with ADHD learns differently from the next student who does not have any complications. ADHD is a problem with inattentiveness, over-activity, impulsivity, or a combination. For these problems to be diagnosed as ADHD, they must be out of the normal range for a child's age and development. The symptoms of ADHD are divided into inattentiveness, and hyperactivity and impulsivity (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 2010).
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Certain children with ADHD mostly have the inattentive form, some the hyperactive- impulsive type, and some the combined type. Those with the inattentive type are less disruptive and are more likely to miss being diagnosed with ADHD. Inattention symptoms:
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This note was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course EDU 673 taught by Professor Jamesyoung during the Fall '10 term at Ashford University.

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Differentiated Learning - Differentiated Learning EDU673...

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