Close Reading - Close Reading 1 of 2 Beyond Expos: Close...

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Close Reading 1 of 2 Beyond Expos: Close Reading What is it? The process of writing an essay usually begins with the close reading of a text. Most essays, especially academic essays, begin with a close reading of some kind of text—a painting, a movie, an event—and usually with that of a written text. When you close read, you observe facts and details about the text. You may focus on a particular passage, or on the text as a whole. Your aim may be to notice all striking features of the text, including rhetorical features, structural elements, cultural references; or, your aim may be to notice only selected features of the text—for instance, oppositions and correspondences, or particular historical references. Either way, making these observations constitutes the first step in the process of close reading. The second step is interpreting your observations. What we're basically talking about here is inductive reasoning: moving from the observation of particular facts and details to a conclusion, or interpretation, based on those observations. And, as with inductive reasoning, close reading requires careful gathering of data (your observations) and careful thinking about what these data add up to. What it’s not It’s not just a reaction to the reading. It’s more than just what you feel . It’s more then just your opinion . It’s more than just a judgement. A reaction can be a start to get you thinking, but close reading is more than that. Why?
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course WRITING 101 at Rutgers.

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Close Reading - Close Reading 1 of 2 Beyond Expos: Close...

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