Wiki3 - outcome that in turn can erode relational dissatisfaction.” According to the article demand/withdraw refers to a communication pattern in

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Intimate Relationships – Romantic As already discussed, arguments are inevitable in relationships. In the article “Demand/Withdraw Patterns in Serial Arguments,” Argyle and Furnham (1983) disclose that while relationships may be a source of satisfaction, they are also a source of frequent conflict. When couples are unable to resolve a conflict completely, it tends to reoccur. Trapp and Hoff (1985) define a serial argument to be an argument that “encompasses a set of argumentative episodes that are focused on a particular issue.” According to Cramer (2002), “not being able to resolve an issue stimulates dissatisfaction with the
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Unformatted text preview: outcome that in turn can erode relational dissatisfaction.” According to the article, demand/withdraw refers to a communication pattern in which one person demands, complains, nags, or criticizes, while the other person withdraws or tries to avoid the issue (Caughlin, 2002; Eldridge & Christensen, 2002).” This has demonstrated detriment in relationship satisfaction. An example of a demand/withdraw situation is when one individual initiates a confrontation out of anger and subsequently the other individual stonewalls. As a result, the conflict is left unresolved and remains open....
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course PSYC 334 at Maryland.

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