Cosmos - Beige Cosmos Produces Red Faces By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD Few gave a thought to the color of the universe until two months ago when

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Beige Cosmos Produces Red Faces By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD Few gave a thought to the color of the universe until two months ago, when astronomers at Johns Hopkins University ran calculations through a spectrum of color schemes and concluded that on average the universe is pale turquoise, or just a shade greener. It is a pleasingly serene color, which made the front pages of newspapers and the TV news. But reality, it turns out, is not so vivid. The universe is really beige. Get used to it. "We got it wrong," the astronomers, Dr. Karl Glazebrook and Dr. Ivan Baldry, announced yesterday. They said they had been led astray by a flaw in their computer software. Determining the cosmic color was an afterthought to an examination of some 200,000 galaxies to learn the rate of star birth as the universe aged. The astronomers then decided to transform the data into an array of colors. They gave a numeric value to the colors of the different galaxies, added them together and came up with the color the universe
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course CSE 442 at SUNY Buffalo.

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Cosmos - Beige Cosmos Produces Red Faces By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD Few gave a thought to the color of the universe until two months ago when

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