4.6 - But it doesn’t have an expanded octet—so don’t...

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Key for Micro Exam 4 Question 6 Question 6: Which species contains an expanded octet and is polar? Answers: (a) sulfur dioxide (b) aluminum trichloride (c) bromine pentafluoride (d) silicon dioxide (e) lead(IV) iodide (f) methane (g) water (h) two of these For an atom to have an expanded octet, it must have more than 8 electrons around it in the form of bonds and lone pairs. So we need the Lewis dot structures—and notice that to solve the problem, you need to know your chemical nomenclature so you can generate the chemical formula from the name. Let’s look at the answers one at a time: Answer a .. .. .. : O :: S : O : .. According to VSEPR, sulfur dioxide will have a trigonal planar arrangement of electron sets (domains) around sulfur, and thus will be polar.
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Unformatted text preview: But it doesn’t have an expanded octet—so don’t choose this one! Answer b is wrong because it is an ionic compound. Answer c is correct. It exceeds the octet rule, and is polar. You can tell it is polar because of the lone pair. The structure (below) shows that the dipoles do not completely cancel each other out. Answer d is wrong because it does not exceed the octet rule and is non-polar. O = Si = O Answer e This is an ionic compound, not a molecular compound. It forms a lattice, not a molecule. Answer f (methane) is wrong because it does not exceed the octet rule and is non-polar. Answer g is wrong because although it is polar, it does not exceed the octet rule....
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4.6 - But it doesn’t have an expanded octet—so don’t...

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