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Stretching and Flexibility.edu

Stretching and Flexibility.edu - Stretching and Flexibility...

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Stretching and Flexibility Gaining flexibility is primarily about discipline. It requires neither great pain nor specialized knowledge of particular tricks. The primary key to gaining flexibility is simply to stretch often. If you do not stretch, or do so only sporadically, your gains in flexibility will be limited. To improve your flexibility, you should stretch at least once a day, and, if possible, multiple times per day. Short, repeated exposure to stretching is more productive than a single intense or long bout of stretching. For example, it is far better to stretch ten minutes per day, every day, than to stretch 70 minutes once a week. Stretching is also a long-term commitment and must be continued indefinitely to maintain and/or increase flexibility. Flexibility is not something that automatically comes with strength training. On the contrary, strength training without stretching can lead to dramatic reduction in flexibility. In many cases, when taken to the extreme, such a lack of flexibility will result in loss of "normal" function, not to mention loss of high-performance function so important to athletes. Making significant increases in flexibility will bring marked improvement in performance. Larger ranges of motion (ROM) will allow for longer periods of applied force, improvement in technique, increases in biomechanical advantages, and reduction in joint strain. When to stretch While stretching should be done as often as possible, and any time is better than no time, when you stretch matters. Most resistance to ROM is a result of muscles contracting to prevent injury, so the more this resistance can be overcome, the more effective stretching sessions will be.
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