Motion Part 2

Motion Part 2 - Motion and Eye Movements Nicholas Ross

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Motion and Eye Movements Nicholas Ross nickross@rci.rutgers.edu
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Eye movements Saccades are fast jerky movements of the eyes as opposed to the smooth pursuit eye movements that Elio discussed Saccades produce rapid and drastic changes in the retinal image
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What happens when our eyes move
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What happens when things move
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The problem Two totally different scenarios (eye moves vs. person moves) send the brain the same change in retinal image How does the brain know whether the retinal image changed because our eyes moved or because things in the world moved ?
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Demo Gently push on your eye from the outside of the eyelid DO NOT TOUCH THE SCLERA (SURFACE OF THE EYE) What do you see?
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Early thoughts It would be helpful for the visual system to know if the eyes moved so it can figure out whether or not things in the world are moving Two Theories Inflow : proprioception (Sherrington, 1918) Outflow : monitor motor command (Helmholtz, 1866)
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Inflow theory Outflow theory Also called Corollary Discharge Theory
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Common Scenario #1 object and eyes are stationary No signal about retinal change No signal about eye movement Brain comparator says there is no motion
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Common Scenario #2 object moves, eyes are stationary Signal for retinal change No signal about eye movement Brain comparator says there is motion since the retinal change can’t be explained by eye movements because the eyes are
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Common Scenario #3 Eye moves, object is stationary Signal for retinal change Signal for eye movement Brain comparator says there is not motion because retinal change can be explained by eye movement
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Common Scenario #4 Eye follows object’s motion No signal about retinal change Signal for eye movement Brain comparator says there is motion since it knows the eye is moving and if something remains in the same place on the moving retina it must also be moving
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Common scenarios Scenario Retina l chang e Eye move Percept object and eyes are stationary no no No movement
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This document was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PSYCH 301 at Rutgers.

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Motion Part 2 - Motion and Eye Movements Nicholas Ross

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