Motion_part1

Motion_part1 - Chapter 8: Motion Chapter 8: Motion Elio...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 8: Motion Chapter 8: Motion Elio Santos Santos86@rci.rutgers.edu Motion after effect What is motion? Demo: http://dogfeathers.com/java/spirals.html Visual processing center Occipital lobe Visual processing center Occipital lobe Area MT Motion Perception Why is motion perception important? Why is area MT important? Snapshots/still images vs. continuous motion Motion Blindness/Akinetopsia Subject L.M. (Zihl et al., 1983) L.M. was not able to perceive motion due to brain damage which affected area MT. L.M. could identify objects but was not able to perceive motion. Camouflage and motion Camouflage and motion Hidden Bird Demo: http://www.psychology.pomona.edu/hiddenbird Relative motion enhances perception and break down camouflage. Finding a camouflaged friend in a crowd. Detecting motion Barlow and Hill (1963) ganglion cells of rabbit (next slide) direction selectivity: Cells responded to rightward OR leftward moving stripes. Ganglion cells in the retina Ganglion cells Detecting motion Barlow and Hill (1963) ganglion cells of rabbit direction selectivity: Cells responded to rightward OR leftward moving stripes. Model of motion detection How can we perceive motion? receptors synapse Model: Cells as motion detectors Motion detector receptors Synapse: delays the signal Cells as motion detectors Motion detector R receptors Synapse: delays the signal Responds to rightward motion Cells as motion detectors Motion detector L...
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Motion_part1 - Chapter 8: Motion Chapter 8: Motion Elio...

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