Sensation _ Perception - lecture 6 - basic visual functions

Sensation _ Perception - lecture 6 - basic visual functions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Basic Visual Functions Lecture 6
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Occipital Lobe Houses primary visual cortex . Damage results in visual disturbances and/or loss of vision. Cortex houses a retinotopic map  of the retina. Map is distorted, fovea is about 35 times the size of the  periphery. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 2
Damage to primary visual cortex results in deficits  in the corresponding part of the visual field. Scotoma Quadrantanopia Hemianopia Cortical Blindness The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Scotoma Damage to visual cortex that results in a “blind patch” in the  visual field.  The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Quadrantanopia Result of more extensive damage to the visual cortex (vs.  scotoma). “Blind patch” encompasses an entire quadrant of the visual  field. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 6
Hemianopia Occurs when damage to visual cortex encompasses half of  the visual field. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 8
Cortical Blindness Complete loss of vision due to extensive damage to the  visual cortex. Distinguished from blindness caused by damage or  malfunction of the eyes, optic tract, or optic nerve. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Occipital lobe contains a  number of sub-regions. V1   primary visual  cortex. V2   similar functions to  V1. V3   form, local  movement. V4   color. V5   global motion. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 10
Nearly all visual information is first processed in area  V1. Largest and most important area of visual cortex. AKA: Striate Cortex … remaining visual areas are known as  Extrastriate Cortex. V1 Represents about 5% of neocortex in humans. Types of cells: Simple Cells Complex Cells End-stopped Cells Most complex region of visual cortex, with at least 6  identifiable layers. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Simple Cells Respond to dark lights or bars that appears in the  appropriate location. Orientation Specificity = a preference for edges of a  particular angle. The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 12
Complex Cells Majority of cells in V1 … Respond to an edge of a  particular orientation.  Aren’t fussy about the position of the stimulus. Seem to prefer a bar or edge that is moving in a given  direction, anywhere in the receptive field.  The Visual Cortex
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
End-Stopped Cells Form of simple and complex cells. Respond vigorously if the stimulus ends within the cell’s  receptive field.
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PSYCH 301 at Rutgers.

Page1 / 61

Sensation _ Perception - lecture 6 - basic visual functions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online