Sensation _ Perception - lecture 6 - basic visual functions

Sensation _ Perception - lecture 6 - basic visual functions...

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Basic Visual Functions Lecture 6
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Occipital Lobe Houses primary visual cortex . Damage results in visual disturbances and/or loss of vision. Cortex houses a retinotopic map  of the retina. Map is distorted, fovea is about 35 times the size of the  periphery. The Visual Cortex
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Damage to primary visual cortex results in deficits  in the corresponding part of the visual field. Scotoma Quadrantanopia Hemianopia Cortical Blindness The Visual Cortex
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Scotoma Damage to visual cortex that results in a “blind patch” in the  visual field.  The Visual Cortex
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Quadrantanopia Result of more extensive damage to the visual cortex (vs.  scotoma). “Blind patch” encompasses an entire quadrant of the visual  field. The Visual Cortex
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Hemianopia Occurs when damage to visual cortex encompasses half of  the visual field. The Visual Cortex
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The Visual Cortex
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Cortical Blindness Complete loss of vision due to extensive damage to the  visual cortex. Distinguished from blindness caused by damage or  malfunction of the eyes, optic tract, or optic nerve. The Visual Cortex
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Occipital lobe contains a  number of sub-regions. V1   primary visual  cortex. V2   similar functions to  V1. V3   form, local  movement. V4   color. V5   global motion. The Visual Cortex
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Nearly all visual information is first processed in area  V1. Largest and most important area of visual cortex. AKA: Striate Cortex … remaining visual areas are known as  Extrastriate Cortex. V1 Represents about 5% of neocortex in humans. Types of cells: Simple Cells Complex Cells End-stopped Cells Most complex region of visual cortex, with at least 6  identifiable layers. The Visual Cortex
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Simple Cells Respond to dark lights or bars that appears in the  appropriate location. Orientation Specificity = a preference for edges of a  particular angle. The Visual Cortex
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Complex Cells Majority of cells in V1 … Respond to an edge of a  particular orientation.  Aren’t fussy about the position of the stimulus. Seem to prefer a bar or edge that is moving in a given  direction, anywhere in the receptive field.  The Visual Cortex
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End-Stopped Cells Form of simple and complex cells. Respond vigorously if the stimulus ends within the cell’s  receptive field. Bars that are longer than the receptive field have an  inhibitory effect on the overall response.
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