Sensation _ Perception - lecture 9 - shape and pattern perception II

Sensation _ Perception - lecture 9 - shape and pattern perception II

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Lecture 9 Shape & Pattern perception II
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Is their a realm of perceptual processing that provides strong support for a lot of the Gestalt arguments? Processes the whole and not individual parts? Go beyond the sensory information present? Attractive forces among features? Localized to a brain region (aka: possesses a mental faculty)? Hint … prosapagnosia
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Facial Perception
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Facial Perception Aristotle  “Men with small foreheads are fickle, whereas if they are round or bulging out, the owners are quick tempered.” Lombroso & Criminal Anthropology  “Each type of crime is committed by men with particular physiognomic characteristics…” “Thieves are notable for their expressive faces and manual dexterity, small wandering eyes that are often oblique in form, thick and close eyebrows, distorted or squashed noses, thin beards and hair, and sloping foreheads.”
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Facial Perception Physiognomy Assessment of a person's character or personality from their outer appearance, especially the face.
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The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872) Facial Perception
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Emotion U.S.A. Brazil Chile Argentina Japan Anger 67% 90% 94% 90% 90% Disgust 92% 97% 92% 92% 90% Fear 85% 67% 68% 54% 66% Happiness 97% 95% 95% 98% 100% Facial Perception
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Facial Perception Cross-Cultural Emotional Expressions (Ekman) Anger Disgust Fear Happiness Sadness Surprise Embodied Cognition (James).
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Facial Perception Anger Trigger = interference with what we are intent on doing. “Anger controls, anger punishes, and anger retaliates.” Cyclical nature. Approach emotion.
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Facial Perception Physiological Signals of Anger Pressure, tension, and heat. Increased heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure. Face may redden.
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Facial Perception Facial Signals of Anger Glaring eyes. Restrained Anger  lips tightly closed, pressed against each other.
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Facial Perception
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Facial Perception Usefulness of Anger Motivates change. Reduces fear and provides energy to deal with threat. Informs others of trouble. Powerful signals in face and voice.
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Disgust Trigger = specific stimuli or the actions, appearance, behaviors and even ideas of others. Universal Triggers = bodily products (vomit, urine, mucus, blood, and feces). Interpersonal vs. Core Disgust Interpersonal Triggers = the strange, diseased, misfortunate, and morally tainted.
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This document was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PSYCH 301 at Rutgers.

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Sensation _ Perception - lecture 9 - shape and pattern perception II

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