Sensation _ Perception - lecture 17 - touch and pain

Sensation _ Perception - lecture 17 - touch and pain -...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 17 Touch and Pain The skin the largest sensory system we possess. The Skin Senses Touch Temperature Pain Types of Skin Hairy Skin covers most of body. Glabrous Skin covers soles of feet, palms of hands, and toes and fingers. The Skin Senses From Skin to Brain Like all other senses, information must reach the brain and be processed. Two systems for carrying information: Spinothalamic System Lemniscal System Both systems carry information to the somatosensory cortex. The Skin Senses Penfield & Rasmussen (1950) Goal = determine relationship (if any) between points on the body and points on the somatosensory cortex. Experiment performed on patients whose skulls were opened for tumor removal. Stimulated patients somatosensory cortex and asked them to report what part of their body was stimulated (tingled). The Somatosensory Cortex The Somatosensory Cortex Pressure results in deformation of the skin, exciting the various nerve endings. Categories of Nerve Endings Rapidly Adapting Receptors (RA Receptors) Respond quickly to changes in pressure. Slowly Adapting Receptors (SA Receptors) Respond continuously to steady/constant pressure on the skin. Both are further subdivided according to the size of the receptive fields. The Skin Senses: Touch Rapidly Adapting Receptors Respond rapidly to pressure changes. Good at picking up vibrations on the skin. Small Receptive Fields Large Receptive Fields Slowly Adapting Receptors Respond slowly to pressure changes. Good at picking up constant pressure on the skin. Small Receptive Fields Large Receptive Fields The Skin Senses: Touch Best understood encapsulated nerve ending. Large RA receptors. Onionlike structure consisting of a number of layers. Pacinian Corpuscles The Skin Senses: Touch The Skin Senses: Touch Passive vs. Active Touch Passive = object is placed on or makes contact with skin. Active = person actively seeks out interactions with object in the external environment. AKA: Haptic Perception. Passive Touch Demonstration 12.4 (pg. 393). Absolute Thresholds for Touch (Weinstein, 1968) Compared men and women, touching them on 2o different body parts with a nylon strand. The Skin Senses: Touch The Skin Senses: Touch Absolute Thresholds for Touch Men vs. Women (Weinstein, 1968): Women are more sensitive to touch than men for several body parts (more sensitive = lower threshold)....
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Sensation _ Perception - lecture 17 - touch and pain -...

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