Lecture 2B-GIS&RS(1)

Lecture 2B-GIS&RS(1) - RemoteSensing...

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Remote Sensing Active remote sensing Passive remote sensing
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Raster Data Source: Remote Sensing Remote sensing properties of ground objects without direct contact Types of remote sensing Aerial photos Satellite images
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Aerial Photos
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Satellite Images http://landsat.usgs.gov/ http://www.digitalglobe.com/
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Characteristics of RS “Snapshot” of the Earth at particular time Resolutions Temporal Spectral Spatial
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Temporal Resolution Frequency with which images are collected for  the same area Examples SPOT – 26 days NOAA AVHRR – twice a day GEOS (geostationary)
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Spectral Resolution Electromagnetic range being measured
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Spatial Resolution Pixel size   the smallest feature that is  identifiable TM 30-meter data MSS 80-meter data
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Hyperspectral RS
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LiDAR
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An image of Manhattan taken by the MODIS instrument on board the TERRA satellite the day after the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. MODIS has a spatial resolution of about 250 m, detailed enough to reveal the coarse shape of Manhattan and to identify the Hudson and East rivers, the burning World Trade Center (white spot), and Central Park (the gray blur with the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir visible as a black dot). (Courtesy NOAA)
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(A) Banda Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia on June 23, 2004, 6 months before the tsunami struck. (B) The same area on December 28, 2004, two days after the earthquake nearby and the consequent tsunami. High-resolution satellite images such as these are of value in directing disaster relief, though prediction of future infrequent events are error prone and unpersuasive to government decision makers (Image Courtesy of DigitalGlobe, www.digitalglobe.com) A B
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(GIS)  GIS systems combine spatial and  attribute data  Maps can contain multiple data layers:
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This document was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course GEO 2200 at FSU.

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Lecture 2B-GIS&RS(1) - RemoteSensing...

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