10_agbiotech_WrldSp2008

10_agbiotech_WrldSp2008 - Lecture 10:The Rock and a Hard...

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1 Lecture 10:The Rock and a Hard Place Agricultural demand and GM applications in Agriculture Technology and Health Issues Geography 1000 SPRING 2008 February 13 Some Terms for Our Test “Golden” Rice and Vitamin A pp. 219, “Franken Foods” pp. 219, Green Revolution pp. 222-223, 227 Problems with “animal farming” pp. 225 Avian Flu pp. 225 Biotechnology and Agriculture pp. 228-232 Cartagera Protocol pp. 231 Precautionary principle pp. 231 Hunger in the US – 38 million persons without food security pp. 234 Causes of Hunger: poverty, drought, And war pp. 238-239 Food aid in 1996 and 1999 pp. 240 47
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2 Will Humankind be doomed by “Frankenfoods” or will “GMOs” save the planet by providing new sources of food? OR “Every [NATIONS’] governments are supporting biotech agricultural research.” Molly Cline-- Director of Food Industry Relations for Monsanto “I believe that genetic modification (GM) is much more than just an extension of selective breeding techniques. Mixing genetic material from species that cannot breed naturally takes us into areas that should be left to God. We should not be meddling with the building blocks of life in this way.”The Prince of Wales St James's Palace, December 1998 Technology and Society • All too often, the effects of any given technology are not clear in the early stages of adoption. It would be great if it was clear, but this is just not the case. There are too many implications to bio- technology to say, “It’s good” or “It’s bad!” • Bt crops present a useful real-time case study which reflect the structural conditions associated with the introduction of new technology.
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3 Biotechnology Current Successes • Biotech crops can reduce pesticide use in corn and cotton. • Biotech crops can boost the nutritional value of crops. • Combat animal diseases by producing a vaccine which prevents “shipping fever” in feedlots. • Crops with resistance to viruses such as “late blight” on the potato (Caused the potato famines in the 1840s) Media responses to Bio-technology • Largely evolved from European Union and Japanese rejections of Bt-grain imports of wheat, corn, and soybeans in the wake of the British and Canadian “mad cow” epidemics. • Laws are coming which will require Bt products to be labeled--resistance to this by farmers concerned about keeping costs low AND access to markets! • Concerns that introduced genes could be toxic or allergenic. PROOF IS LIMITED AS BEST AS I CAN Determine. What is biotechnology? • A Collection of scientific techniques including genetic engineering, that are used to create, improve, or modify plants, animals, and microorganisms. • For crops, most products have been developed for corn, cotton, potato, soybean, tobacco, and tomato
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4 How widespread are Biotech crops? • Over 20,000 field trials have been
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10_agbiotech_WrldSp2008 - Lecture 10:The Rock and a Hard...

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