Rubenstein_Exp13

Rubenstein_Exp13 - Experiment 13 Chemical Kinetics Spring...

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Experiment 13 – Chemical Kinetics Spring 2010 Name Alec Rubenstein Lab Section 438 Point Summary (See Blackboard for detailed grading rubric) Superior Excellent Satisfactory Fair Poor Omitted Introduction •Purpose of Report •Goals of Experiment Materials and Methods Results and Discussion •Description of data •Data Tables •Data Table Titles •Graphs •Figure Captions •Sample Calculations •Systematic Error •Random Error •Discussion of discrepancies Other Lab Technique TOTAL POINTS TA Comments/Suggestions:
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C HEMISTRY 102L R EPORT T EMPLATE EXPT. Chemical Kinetics: Reaction of Crystal Violet with Sodium Hydroxide 13 13 Introduction The purpose of this report is to gain an understanding of chemical kinetics by observing the effects of reactant concentration on reaction rate in a Crystal Violet with NaOH reaction and to experimentally determine the rate law and rate constant for a model reaction of Crystal Violet with NaOH. The objective of the experiment was determine the rate law and rate constant for a reaction of Crystal Violet with NaOH by using colorimetry and a colorimeter to measure the color change of the solution, which measures the concentration change of Crystal Violet to NaOH. The measured concentration changes can then be used to determine the rate law and rate constant for the reaction using the Integrated Rate Laws and Initial Rate Method. Materials and Methods The procedure for this experiment was taken from UNC Chemistry 102 Lab Manual, Experiment 13: Chemical Kinetics, Spring Semester. No deviations were taken from the given procedure. Results and Discussion The rate of a chemical reaction describes the change in concentration of the reacting substance per unit of time which in this experiment was the reaction of 1 mL of 0.10 M NaOH with varying Crystal Violet solution concentrations. Colorimetry can be used to measure the rate of a chemical reaction because it uses the mathematical relationship of Beer’s law, bc A ε = , where A =Absorbance, = molar extinction coefficient, b =path length of light, and c =concentration, to calculate the changes in concentration of the reacting substance per unit of time by measuring the absorbance of the Crystal Violet with NaOH solution in the cuvette in the colorimetery over time. When Beer’s law is expressed as a linear equation, it allows for the determination of the concentration Crystal Violet by measuring the solution’s absorbance. The concentration of the solution can then be used to describe the rate of the reaction.
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Figure 1. Graphical Analysis of Beer’s Law Plot of Absorbance vs. Concentration (x 10 -6 M). The slope 0.0469 is equivalent to ε x b in the Beer’s Law equation bc A = , where A =Absorbance, = molar extinction coefficient, b =path length of light, and c =concentration. The correlation coefficient of 1.00 proves the linear Beer’s Lw relationship Table 1. Tabular Analysis of Slope, y-intercept and Correlation coefficient from Beer’s Law plot of
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Rubenstein_Exp13 - Experiment 13 Chemical Kinetics Spring...

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