Nuclear envelope - Under the inner membrane you have the nuclear lamina The nuclear lamina is a fibrous meshwork that provides structural support

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Nuclear envelope Nuclear membranes act as barriers that prevent the free passage of molecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Two concentric membranes (phospholipid bilayers) are called the inner and outer nuclear membranes. The outer nuclear membrane is continuous with the ER so the space between the inner and outer membrane is directly connected with the lumen of the ER. This space is termed the perinuclear space . Channels through membrane provided by nuclear pores. Selective traffic of proteins and RNAs through these pores.
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Unformatted text preview: Under the inner membrane you have the nuclear lamina . The nuclear lamina is a fibrous meshwork that provides structural support to the nucleus. Network of proteins known as lamins . The lamins associate with each other to form filaments. In addition to providing structural support, the nuclear lamina is thought to serve as a site of chromatin attachment. Chromatin within the nucleus is organized into large loops of DNA, some of which appear to be bound to the nuclear envelope. The lamins may help to mediate this interaction....
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course BIOLOGY MCB2010 at Broward College.

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