The regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is similar in principle to regulation in prokaryotes

The regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is similar in principle to regulation in prokaryotes

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The regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is similar in principle to regulation in prokaryotes. However, in higher eukaryotes such as humans there are more than 200 different types of cells. Each of these cells contains the same genetic information so the genes are differentially expressed in each cell type. There are housekeeping genes which probably represent the majority of the genome, which includes the genes required for general cell structure/function. The housekeeping genes are, therefore,
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Unformatted text preview: transcriptionally active in all cells. The regulation of gene expression is primarily at the level of transcription (transcriptional regulation). As seen in prokaryotes, there are a wide variety of regulatory proteins which bind to specific regulatory sequences on the DNA. There are cis-acting regulatory sequences [present on the same chromosome and usually adjacent to the actual gene]. promoters enhancers GC sequences silencers...
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This document was uploaded on 11/03/2011 for the course BIOLOGY MCB2010 at Broward College.

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