Chapter 10 & 11 Negaitive and Persuasive Messages

Chapter 10 & 11 Negaitive and Persuasive Messages -...

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The Art of Writing Bad News “To be agreeable while disagreeing – that’s an art” (Malcolm Forbes in Guffey, 2005, P. 352)
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Under what circumstances would an organization need to write a negative news letter?
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Things go wrong; companies make mistakes. How would you deal with a disappointed customer?
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Guffey, Rhodes, Rogin Business Communication: Process and Product, Fourth Canadian Edition Ch. 11, Slide 4 Damage Control Call the individual involved Describe the problem and apologize Explain why the problem occurred and what you are doing to resolve it Follow up with a letter that documents the discussion and promotes goodwill
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As the writer of bad news for your organization, what are you ultimately trying to achieve?
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Guffey, Rhodes, Rogin Business Communication: Process and Product, Fourth Canadian Edition Ch. 11, Slide 6 Goals in Communicating Bad News Acceptance - to make the reader understand and accept the bad news Positive Image - to promote and maintain a good image of the writer and the writer’s organization Clarity - to make the message so clear that additional correspondence is unnecessary Protection - to avoid legal liability
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What are some of the ways you can get yourself and your organization into trouble if you don’t phrase your writing very carefully?
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Guffey, Rhodes, Rogin Business Communication: Process and Product, Fourth Canadian Edition Ch. 11, Slide 8 Avoiding Three Causes of Legal Problems 1. Abusive language Defamation use of any language that harms a person’s reputation Libel written defamation Slander spoken defamation 3. Careless language Statements that are potentially damaging or that could be misinterpreted 5. “Good-guy” syndrome S tatements that ease your conscience or make you look good (I thought you were an excellent candidate, but we had to hire . . . )
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Guffey, Rhodes, Rogin Business Communication: Process and Product, Fourth Canadian Edition Ch. 11, Slide 9 Acting Cautiously As an agent of an organization, be sure your views reflect those of your organization. Use plain paper for your personal views or personal business. Avoid supplying information that could be misused. Don’t admit or imply responsibility without checking with legal counsel.
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When writing bad news, should you use the Direct or Indirect pattern?
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Under what circumstances would the Direct pattern be more effective?
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Guffey, Rhodes, Rogin Business Communication: Process and Product, Fourth Canadian Edition Ch. 11, Slide 12 Use Direct when… The receiver may overlook the bad news
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Chapter 10 & 11 Negaitive and Persuasive Messages -...

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