93954-0205648541_ch09

93954-0205648541_ch09 - TheStruggleForDemocracy...

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The Struggle For Democracy Chapter 9:  Political Parties
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Critical Thinking What does the Constitution say about  political parties? How did the Framers feel about political  parties?
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The Role of Political Parties In a Democracy Definition:   non-governmental  organizations that draw like-minded  individuals together who recruit and run  candidates for public office in order to  influence the government
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Parties: Keep elected officials responsive to the people Include a broad range of groups  Lee Atwater’s “Big Tent” philosophy Stimulate political interest Ensure accountability
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History of the Two-Party System Comparative Politics Most nations have a one-party or multi-party  government The United States is unique in that it has two  parties dominate the political landscape Why?
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History of the Two-Party System Why do we only have two parties? Institutional factors Single-member districts Electoral College No  proportional representation Winner-take-all or plurality system Rules governing parties, ballot issues,  fundraising, etc.
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History of the Two-Party System Why else? Cultural Factors The American tradition of “moderation,  deliberation and compromise” Most voters really are in the middle of the road;  this makes it hard for third (or minor or protest)  parties to develop Large middle class that is  relatively  satisfied
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History of the Two-Party System Why else? Party identification:
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PLSI 200 taught by Professor Schendan during the Fall '08 term at S.F. State.

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93954-0205648541_ch09 - TheStruggleForDemocracy...

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