Gene structure in - Gene structure in prokaryotes often...

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Gene structure in prokaryotes often takes the form of an operon which is a set of adjacent structural and regulatory genes. The coding regions (= genes) are uninterrupted open reading frames of DNA that are transcribed as one RNA and translated into distinct polypeptides. The adjacent regulatory regions can alter the expression of the genes in response to specific signals from the cell. Gene structure in eukaryotes is quite different , most notably in that the coding regions are often broken up into exons (expressed) and introns (intervening sequences). Other specific sequences in the DNA can serve as promoter elements to stimulate transcription. The intron/exon structure of eukaryotic genes means that after transcription into RNA (called the pre-messenger RNA), the intron sequences in the RNA must be removed and the exon sequence spliced back together. After splicing, the RNA is called the messenger RNA (or "mature" messenger RNA) and is transported out of the cell nucleus into the cytoplasm where it will be transcribed into
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Gene structure in - Gene structure in prokaryotes often...

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