Art Deco - century, including Cubism, Constructivism, and...

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Art Deco: (1920 - 1935) Also called art moderne, Art Deco was characterized by linear decorative designs that were reminiscent  of modern technology. It emphasized long, thin forms, curved surfaces and geometric patterns in order to  symbolize the expanse of the machine age. Although it was popular in the 1920’s and 1930’s, the  movement received its name in the 1960’s derived from the 1925 Paris Exposition of Decorative Arts. Art Deco was a modernization of many different artistic styles and themes from the past. It borrows from  Far and Middle East design, Greek and Roman themes, and also Egyptian and Mayan influence.  Emphasizing abstraction, distortion, and simplification by use of geometric shapes and intense colors, the  movement derived these characteristics from the avant-garde painting styles of the early twentieth 
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Unformatted text preview: century, including Cubism, Constructivism, and Italian Futurism. Similar to the Art Nouveau and Precisionist movements of the same time period, Art Deco is distinguished by a more modern look. Modern concepts such as machine and automobile patterns and stylized gear and wheel shapes were used to celebrate the rise of commerce, technology, and speed. Art Deco was influential in the arts and architecture, primarily the decorative, industrial, and graphic arts. It was also a popular style in fashion, furniture, jewelry, and textiles. The most renowned Art Deco artist is glassmaker and jeweler, Rene Lalique. Two well-known U.S. buildings executed in the Art Deco approach include Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building. Artists: (biography & artworks) Manship, Paul - 1885 - 1966 Manship, Paul - 1885 - 1966...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course ARH ARH2000 taught by Professor Karenroberts during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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