Sil1 - setting probably adds to the sense of calm. Very...

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Sil'vestr Feodosievich Shchedrin: Moonlit Night in Naples (1828) Oil on canvas, 42.5 x 59.6 cm. Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow. In this work, Shchedrin continues to explore Italian landscape. In this painting, the elements of the Romantic Movement that characterize western painting of the time are much more evident. The scene is at night with the moon shining through the clouds. Everything is touched by the ethereal light and the water shines brightly. The contours are blurred as in a dream. The only " realistic" element is the presence of some figures in the very left corner. The attention is drawn to the little fire around which the people are gathered, depicted with the only warm tone color of the whole painting. Everywhere else the color scheme is made of cold hues and shadows with the exception of the sections touched by the moonlight. It is a very peaceful scenery, and the night
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Unformatted text preview: setting probably adds to the sense of calm. Very little space is occupied by actual physical elements, such as the buildings or the boats, while most of the composition is focused on the depiction of the sky and the water. The moon is the main character here. It is the focus of this composition. Its light touches everything as a "wash" given to the whole landscape. To emphasize the importance of the moon, Shchedrin uses lines that point to the moon itself; the clouds are a primary example, but the boats' masts and the position of the building also provide a kind of frame for the main element. Shchedrin seems to maintain once again his tendency to combine the romantic traits such as the natural elements, with the presence of few human figures as if he wanted to include a bit of real life in this predominantly Romantic composition....
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course ARH ARH2000 taught by Professor Karenroberts during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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