The Empyrium - heaven, what does Dante talk about?...

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The Empyrium Slide 10-82: DI PAOLO: Cosmic Rose Pope-Hennessy, John. Paradiso. The Illuminations of Dante's Divine Comedy by Giovanni di Paolo. NY: Random, 1993. p. 177 We finally reach the Empyrian, the highest heavenly realm, supposed to be composed by a kind of sublimated fire, the uppermost Paradise, the heaven; the seat of God. The image that dominates the final Cantos of Paradiso is the cosmic rose, shown by di Paolo as an actual rose, with nine angels and the Trinity. And in the very last paragraph of The Divine Comedy, at the end of this fantastic journey down to hell and back, and through purgatory, and up through the circles of
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Unformatted text preview: heaven, what does Dante talk about? Beatrice? God? No. He talks about geometry. As the geometer who attempts to measure the circle and discovers not . . . the principle he wants, So was I at that new sight I wished to see how the image conformed to the circle [but] here my power failed, but my desire and my will were revolved, like a wheel that is evenly moved by the love which moves the sun and the other stars. So we end our journey to the heavens with love and with geometry; what more could anyone who loves math ask for?...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course ARH ARH2000 taught by Professor Karenroberts during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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