The camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible

The camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible to the eye. And yet, the photographer who wields it well can depict what lies unseen in his memory. In fact, a true photographer in the greatest sense should be able to portray that which is invisible. Edward Weston’s Cypress Root , for example, is nothing but a photo of the root of a tree—but what an overpowering life lies within it! —Eikoh Hosoe Today Conclude Photography as metaphor International photography: Japan, Mexico, Africa With a few exceptions, the rest of our semester focuses on American photography. Before we launch into that, I want to survey the work of several important international photographers.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Many explore the same concerns as Americans and Europeans; others offer unique visions. Photographers Tetsuya Ichimura, n.d. Yasuhiro Ishimoto, 1921 Domon Ken, 19091990 Eikoh Hosoe, 1933 Shomei Tomatsu, 1930 Yasumasa Morimura, n.d. Masahisa Fukasi, 1934 Suda Issei, 1940 Ryoji Akiyama, Yanagi Miwa, 1967 Manuel Alvarez Bravo, 19022002 Graciela Iturbide, 1942 Peter Magubane. 1932 Alexander Joe, 1951 Mohamed Amin, n.d. Santu Mofokeng, 1956 Abdourahamn Issa, n.d. Alioure B, 1959 Seydou Keita, 1923 Uwe Ommer, 1943 Obie Oberholzer, 1947 Chris Ledochowski, 1956 Rotini Fani-Kayode, 19551989 Class 15. International photography...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online