The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had

The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had

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The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had taken of my hospital experience.… I was absolutely staggered at what I’d photographed. I couldn’t believe that I had seen so much and already forgotten it. I had already disavowed what had happened to me. But here were the photographs that my guardian self had taken—so much detail. This points up one of the advantages of photographing one’s traumas—before they become sealed over. —Jo Spence Photographers Lucas Samaras, 1936– Jo Spence, 1934–1992 John Coplans, 1920-2003 Francesca Woodman, 1958–1981 Vera Lindorff (Veruschka), n.d. Dieter Appelt, 1935– Jo Spence Referring to a white-coated doctor, accompanied by medical students, examining her in hospital, As he referred to his notes, without introduction, he bent over me and began to ink a cross onto the area of flesh above my left breast.… I heard this doctor, whom I had never met before, this potential daylight mugger, tell me that my left breast would have to be removed. Equally, I heard myself answer, ‘No’. Of her decision to record her medical experience
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The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had

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