A concept that places phenotypic plasticity in the context of a genotype

A concept that places phenotypic plasticity in the context of a genotype

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A concept that places phenotypic plasticity in the context of a genotype- specific response is the norm of reaction . A norm of reaction is an array of phenotypes that will be developed by a genotype over an array of environments. The quantification of a norm of reaction is conceptually quite simple: one obtains a number of different genotypes (clonal pants are great for this) and grows each one in a variety of different environments (e.g., different nutrient, light, water conditions). After a period of growth one measures the desired trait(s) from each individual and plots the data out as shown in figure below; this case for Drosophila bristles. Each line represents the data for a different genotype. If all lines are perfectly horizontal and on top of one another there is no effect of environment (E) or genotype (G) in case 1 below (each genotype is x, y
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Unformatted text preview: or z). If all lines are not horizontal but on top of each other there is an environmental effect, but no genotype effect (case 2). If all lines are horizontal but at different positions there is no effect of environment but there is an effect of genotype (case 3 below). If lines not horizontal but are parallel there is an effect of environment and genotype, but there is no genotype x environment interaction (figure and case 4 below). If the lines are anything other than horizontal, there is an effect of environment. If the lines are neither horizontal nor parallel there is an effect of I) environment (nonhorizontality), ii) genotype (lines not on top of each other) and iii) genotype x environment interaction (not parallel; case 5 below)....
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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