MODELS OF SPECIATION

MODELS OF SPECIATION - MODELS OF SPECIATION Speciation is a...

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MODELS OF SPECIATION Speciation is a fundamental issue in evolutionary biology, but it is both fascinating and frustrating: we know it does happen but it its an historical phenomenon so it is difficult to observe. The two camps of evolutionary biologists best equipped to deal with speciation (in terms of mechanism, population geneticists; in terms of time- frames, paleontologists) are both incapable of "seeing" speciation except in very special situations. We must rely on strong inference to properly understand speciation. This inference is in many cases very rigorous and scientific although it is historical, i.e., requires an interpretation of what has gone on in the past. Defining speciation depends on one's species concept . (Recall species concepts: typological, evolutionary, biological, recognition). In its simplest form speciation is lineage splitting ; the resulting lineages are genetically isolated and ecologically distinct. This implies that something intrinsic about the new lineages (an aspect of its
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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