Recent analyses with microsatellites in human populations give slightly different numbers

Recent analyses with microsatellites in human populations give slightly different numbers

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Recent analyses with microsatellites in human populations give slightly different numbers, but the general conclusions are the same. Microsatellites are regions of the genome that generally show a repetition of a simple sequence, such as CA repeated over and over. In some instances the repeated units can be longer and these regions are called minisatellites. See figs. 10.9, 10.10, pg. 271-272 for an example. Such regions are very useful since the repeated sequence allows for the insertion and deletion of repeats. As a result, there can be many alleles in a population that differ in the number of repeated units in the specific region of the chromosome. This allows for the discrimination among individuals, based on whether they share, or do not share, alleles of similar length. This is determined by amplifying a person's DNA using specific primers in a PCR reaction, and running the two samples
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Unformatted text preview: out on a gel. If bands are shared, the two individuals are related, if the band sizes do not match, the two are unrelated (or if you are an accused criminal, you might be convicted or let off the hook based on these sorts of DNA 'fingerprint' analyses). As with protein allele frequencies, one can still calculate the H values described above and partition the variation into different levels of a hierarchy. Lewontin concludes that there is no genetic or taxonomic basis to racial distinction and classifications of this sort are of no social value. While you are free to agree or disagree with Lewontin's social interpretation of the data, the population genetic conclusions are clear: with the largest component due to variation among individuals within populations, each and every one of us matters....
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIO BSC1010 taught by Professor Gwenhauner during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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