CHAPTER_ppt_10_7 - 10.7 Complex Numbers Martin-Gay...

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Unformatted text preview: § 10.7 Complex Numbers Martin-Gay, Beginning and Intermediate Algebra, 4ed 2 Imaginary Numbers Previously, when we encountered square roots of negative numbers in solving equations, we would say “no real solution” or “not a real number”. Imaginary Unit The imaginary unit i, is the number whose square is – 1. That is, 2 1 and 1 i i = - =- Martin-Gay, Beginning and Intermediate Algebra, 4ed 3 Write the following with the i notation. =- 25 =- ⋅ 1 25 =- 32 =- ⋅ 1 32 =- ⋅ ⋅ 1 2 16 =-- 121 ( 29 =- ⋅- 1 121 5 i 11- i 2 4 i = ⋅ 2 4 i The Imaginary Unit, i Example: Martin-Gay, Beginning and Intermediate Algebra, 4ed 4 Real numbers and imaginary numbers are both subsets of a new set of numbers. Complex Numbers A complex number is a number that can be written in the form a + bi , where a and b are real numbers. Complex Numbers Martin-Gay, Beginning and Intermediate Algebra, 4ed 5 Complex numbers can be written in the form a + b i (called standard form ), with both a and b as real numbers. a is a real number and b i would be an imaginary number....
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CHAPTER_ppt_10_7 - 10.7 Complex Numbers Martin-Gay...

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