4_6_05_216j_rev

4_6_05_216j_rev - 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics...

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics 2005/4/6 (W), Week 9, Class 17 Readings M. Catherine Maternowska. 2000. “A Clinic in Conflict: a political economy case study of family planning in Haiti.” In Contraception Across Cultures: Technologies, Choices, Constraints, edited by Andrew Russell, Elisa J Sobo, and Mary S Thompson, pp 103-126. Jok Madut Jok, “Militarism, Gender and Reproductive Suffering: the Case of Abortion in Western Dinka,” in Africa , vol. 69, no. 2, 1999, pp. 194-212. Ann Anagnost. 2000. “A Surfeit of Bodies: Population and the Rationality of the State in Post-Mao China.” In Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction , pp 22-41. Class Business Reflection papers had a little too much summary Two handouts Body community historical change over model Blackboard: James’s model of personhood, embodiment, and the situated ‘self’ /Self local moral world – culture power politics are embedded here and at all levels family, kin, clan, lineage, ancestors time affects this Nation political economy national ideology international forces also political economy cultural representatio ns, ideology, media, cultural symbols—at all levels Student Presenter M. Catherine Maternowska. 2000. “A Clinic in Conflict: a political economy case study of family planning in Haiti.” In Contraception Across Cultures: James: Very poor area in the capital, gang-ridden; owned by light-skinned, upper class family in Haiti, notorious for a scandal, tainted drugs from China by way of Germany, resulted in kidney failure and death of many children and profiled on 60 Minutes . © 2005 MIT OCW 1
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Control of Cité Soleil, unseen “mob” family. Clinics were spaces of surveillance. Local thugs and gangs etc. Clinic was better off than other places in the area. The study concerned 2 doctors, a dozen staff, 153 cases of 1,000 people, or some overwhelming number of patients for two doctors. She presents encounters between female clients and doctors to show how it reflects broader social relations (106), quoting another researcher. o Basically, doctors treated the patients very poorly and were very condescending. Doctors viewed them as slaves, lower-classes. Doctors came from privileged backgrounds. Clinical trials and international intervention provided a large sum of money. o Would assume diagnosis without regard to feelings, proscribe medications and contraceptives without thought, carelessly. Are they really doctors? Are they doing anything that anyone else could do? It seemed to indicate that they weren’t. o Why do women seek abortion and why is there low contraceptive use? o The disconnect between the doctors’ view, oblivious to the patient’s situation; focus on contraception, changing biology to face broader social problems, going back to eugenics, national policies, particular populations Political economy of fertility (Ginsburg)—three elements, historical/colonial, cultural element, power element of doctors over patients. Clinic as a microcosm for power analysis into reproductive relationships.
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4_6_05_216j_rev - 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics...

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