CL+Fa10+L14+_+15+_Ch+10_-S

CL+Fa10+L14+_+15+_Ch+10_-S - Conditioning Learning Lectures...

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Conditioning & Learning: Conditioning & Learning: Lectures 14 & 15 Lectures 14 & 15 Aversive Control: Avoidance & Punishment (Ch 10)
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Outline: Aversive Control: Outline: Aversive Control: Avoidance & Punishment (Ch Avoidance & Punishment (Ch 10) 10) I. Avoidance Behavior Avoidance : must make a response to prevent an aversive/unpleasant stimulus; negative contingency b/w I. Punishment Punishment : response produces aversive/unpleasant stimulus; positive contingency b/w behavior & outcome
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I. Avoidance Behavior I. Avoidance Behavior Origins of the study of avoidance behavior Discriminated avoidance procedure 2-Process Theory of Avoidance Experimental analysis of avoidance behavior Alternative theoretical accounts of avoidance behavior Avoidance puzzle
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I. Avoidance Behavior: Origins I. Avoidance Behavior: Origins Bechterev (1913): CC w/ humans; CS signaling finger shock (US) Learned to lift finger during CS didn’t receive US Brogden et al (1938) guinea pigs:Tone (CS) & shock (US); wheel movement (CR) CC grp: shock 2 sec after CS AC: if CR during CS, no shock (US) Findings: Fig 10.1 Based on Fig 10.2
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I. Avoidance Behavior: Discriminated I. Avoidance Behavior: Discriminated Avoidance Procedure Avoidance Procedure Discriminated, signaled, avoidance : aversive US has warning signal (CS) Avoidance trial : subject makes IR b4 US delivered, CS turned off & US doesn’t occur Escape trial : subject doesn’t make IR in the CS-US interval, so CS & US occur until IR occurs Fig 10.4. Shuttle box Fig 10.3. Discriminated avoidance
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I. Avoidance Behavior: 2-Process I. Avoidance Behavior: 2-Process Theory of Avoidance Theory of Avoidance 2 mechanisms involved in avoidance: CC fear to CS: fear as source of motivation IC reinforcement of avoidance response through fear reduction: less fear is rewarding CC & IC rely upon one another: fear has to be conditioned to CS 1 st , then successful fear reduction depends on IR Avoidance behavior as escape from conditioned fear rather than shock prevention (reinforcer made tangible)
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I. Avoidance Behavior: Fear & the I. Avoidance Behavior: Fear & the Amygdala Amygdala Amygdala (part of limbic system) is key neuroanatomical component of fear Stimulating amygdala fear responses Lesioning amygdala impairs fear & fear conditioning 3 pathways: 1) direct (fast), 2) mediated by cortical inputs (more nuanced), 3) via hippocampus
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I. Avoidance Behavior: Experimental I. Avoidance Behavior: Experimental Analysis Analysis Acquired-drive experiments Independent measurement of fear during acquisition of avoidance behavior Extinction of avoidance behavior through Nondiscriminated (Free-Operant) avoidance Demonstrations of free-operant avoidance learning Free-operant avoidance & 2-Process Theory
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I. Experimental Analysis of Avoidance
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CL+Fa10+L14+_+15+_Ch+10_-S - Conditioning Learning Lectures...

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