Lecture09+full+notes

Lecture09+full+notes - Slide 1 Lecture 09: Parietal Lobe HP...

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Slide 1 Lecture 09: Parietal Lobe HP was a 28 yo accountant planning his wedding w/ his fiance when she noticed he was making small math errors. At first, they thought it was rather funny, given his occupation, but soon he couldn‟t do even basic subtraction like 30-19. Initially, he just thought he was working too hard, but then he started having problems reaching for objects, constantly knocking things over because his movements were clumsy & misdirected. This progressed & then he began to have language difficulties – problems reading & speaking, in which he would mix up words & be unable to understand what he was saying. By the time he finally saw a neurologist, he was diagnosed w/ a fast- growing parietal tumor & died within a couple of months.
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Slide 2 Review Questions 1) What is the basic pathway for incoming visual information? 2) Describe the characteristics of the 2 types of photoreceptors. 3) Describe how information travels from the visual fields to the striate cortex. 4) What are the 3 different types of neurons in the striate cortex? How can you tell which type of neuron a given cell is? 5) Describe the flow of information from the striate (primary visual) cortex. 6) What types of information are each of the “streams” responsible for? What are their neuroanatomical targets? 7) List & describe the disorders of the dorsal & ventral streams.
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Slide 3 Parietal Lobe: Outline I. Neuroanatomy I. Functional zones II. Connections II. Somatosensation III. Functional theories IV. Effects of damage Principle function of parietal ctx is the processing & integration of somatosensory & visual information, particularly (as we saw from our case study) as it relates to movement. We‟ll progress through in much the same way we did with the last lobe – starting w/ neuroanat (including functional zones & connections), discussing a theoretical model of parietal lobe organization & then finishing up with when things go horribly wrong. The symptoms of our case study HP are typical of left parietal injury, but they are very difficult to understand. One of the main reasons for this is that many of them involve higher-level cognitive functions (e.g., language, math) that are very difficult to model/study in animals. As such, understanding function of the parietal lobe is especially dependent upon neuropsych assessment.
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Slide 4 I. Anatomy of Parietal Lobe • Boundaries – Anterior : central sulcus – Ventral : lateral (Sylvian) fissure – Posterior : parieto-occipital sulcus – Dorsal : cingulate gyrus Flanked by frontal lobe (to the anterior), occipital lobe (to posterior), and temporal lobe (ventral).
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Slide 5 Parieto-occipital sulcus Cingulate gyrus Central sulcus Lateral (sylvian) fissure
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Slide 6 I. Functional Zones of Parietal Cortex Anterior zone : – Corresponds to postcentral gyrus – Concerned with somatosensory processing Posterior zone : – All areas between postcentral gyrus and parieto-occipital sulcus • referred to as posterior parietal ctx
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Lecture09+full+notes - Slide 1 Lecture 09: Parietal Lobe HP...

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