Lecture23+full+notes

Lecture23+full+notes - Slide 1 Review Questions 1. What is...

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Slide 1 Review Questions 1. What is cerebral asymmetry/laterality? 2. Describe 4 anatomical differences between the 3. What is the corpus callosum & what is its function? 4. What is the purpose of commissurotomy? What has it revealed about laterality? 5. Describe a standard test to examine laterality in split-brain patients. 6. How is laterality assessed in normal subjects? 7. List some consistent sex differences in cognitive tasks.
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Slide 2 Language Case study KH: Swiss-born architect working as professor at US university. German was his native language, but also fluently spoke French & Italian & English was his primary language (spoke 4 languages). He had excellent written skills, & was shocked when his mom complained that his letters to her (written in German) were full of spelling & grammatical errors. He figured he was just forgetting his German & determined to not let that happen. However, a few weeks later he handed a manuscript to a colleague for review & his colleague also noted errors atypical of KH. Around the same time, KH noticed that the left side of his face seemed a bit strange. So, he went to the neurologist, who discovered a small tumor at the junction of the motor-face area & Broca’s area in the left hemisphere. He had surgery to remove the tumor, and although warned that he would likely experience some temporary aphasia, was very disturbed by his language difficulties. By end of 1 st week, he began to understand oral language, but nd week, could speak German fluently, but still had English impairments. Even years later, had trouble reading & spelling.
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Slide 3 Outline of Language I. What is language II. Background of language I. Components II. Nature III. Theory III. Neuroanatomy of language IV. Disorders Although language is one of our most essential abilities & allows us to meaningfully navigate our social & intellectual world, we often take it for granted until it is lost (like our case study). It is one of the 1 st things to develop in young children – before walking, climbing, getting dressed. We use it to talk to other, to ourselves, to entertain ourselves & others w/ poetry, song, jokes.
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Slide 4 I. What is Language? • Combination of sounds for communication • Use of sounds guided by rules • Uniquely human? 1 st , we must consider what language is. Although we have a common-sense notion of what the term means, we have trouble defining its essence because how do we determine what constitutes language from what does not? While this is a philosophical query, we need to start somewhere to define it. 2 useful conventions for defining language: combination of sounds for the purpose of communication, which is guided by rules. These rules of sound communication allow language to be translated into other sensory modalities – touch (Braille), visual images (words, kanji), gestures (ASL). While no other organism uses language in the same way that we humans do, other species have evolved communication through sound, sight, touch, olfaction.
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course 830 310 taught by Professor Joannehash-converse during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lecture23+full+notes - Slide 1 Review Questions 1. What is...

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