Lectures_Parietal_Lobe_S

Lectures_Parietal_Lo - Lecture 09 Parietal Lobe Parietal Lobe Outline I Neuroanatomy II Functional zones III Connections IV Somatosensation V

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Lecture 09: Parietal Lobe
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Parietal Lobe: Outline I. Neuroanatomy II. Functional zones III. Connections IV. Somatosensation V. Functional theories VI. Effects of damage
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I. Anatomy of Parietal Lobe Boundaries Anterior : central sulcus Ventral : lateral (Sylvian) fissure Posterior : parieto-occipital sulcus Dorsal : cingulate gyrus
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Parieto-occipital sulcus Cingulate gyrus Central sulcus Lateral (sylvian) fissure
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Functional Zones of Parietal Cortex Anterior zone : Corresponds to postcentral gyrus Concerned with somatosensory processing Posterior zone : All areas between postcentral gyrus and parieto-occipital sulcus Concerned with integrating somatosensory information in preparation for action
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SENSATION Psychological ACTION INFORMATION PROCESSING EFFECTOR RESPONSE Sensorimotor function
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Connections of the parietal lobe To cingulate gyrus
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Somatosensory cortex (Primary cortex for Receipt of tactile and kinesthetic somatic information)
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somatosensation
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Somatosensation Three interactive somatosensory systems 1. Exteroceptive : Skin (i.e. cutaneous) 2. Proprioceptive (kinesthetic) : Body position and movement (joints, tendons, muscles) 1. Interoceptive : Internal conditions (eg., temperature, chemistry)
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The Spinal Cord
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unipolar neuron
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Topography of cutaneous sensation Dermatome : area of skin innervated by a single dorsal root nerve Dermatomal map
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Somatosensory Cortex primary cortex Initial processing secondary cortex Associative
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Somatic sensations ascend via spinal cord to the lateral portion of the ventral posterior nucleus (VPL)
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Ascending somatosensory pathways 1. Dorsal-column medial-lemniscus pathway (Touch and proprioception) 2. Anterolateral system (spino-thalamic tract) (Pain and temperature)
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Dorsal-column medial-lemniscus pathway Anterolateral system (spino-thalamic tract) decussation sensation of contralateral side Ventral posterior Nucleus of thalamus Somatosensory cortex receives information from the contralateral side of the body
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Theory of Parietal Cortex Function 1. Somatosensation provides information about the location of any part of the body 2. Somatosensory information allows for accurate monitoring of visual (or auditory) information for the purpose of accurate grasp, touch, manipulation and observation 3. Visual and auditory information provides information about the location of object in three-dimensional space 4. Mental manipulation of words, letters, numbers 5. Ultimately, parietal cortex takes the sensory information in three- dimensional space (i.e. spatial information) and transmits it to other areas of the brain for decisions on action or inaction Therefore, parietal cortex allows for recognition of objects in space and then accurately guides the motor actions needed to meaningfully interact with these objects eg., reading requires accurate movement of ocular muscles not only over the letters, but also lines and direction of reading
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course 830 310 taught by Professor Joannehash-converse during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lectures_Parietal_Lo - Lecture 09 Parietal Lobe Parietal Lobe Outline I Neuroanatomy II Functional zones III Connections IV Somatosensation V

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