Lectures13_14_Frontal_S

Lectures13_14_Frontal_S - Review Questions 1. What region...

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Review Questions 1. What region of the brain did we discuss before Spring Break? 2. What types of auditory sensation & perception problems occur subsequent to left temporal lobe damage? 3. How is selective attention to stimuli altered by temporal lobe damage? 4. How do problems with organizational ability cross symptom domains? 5. What symptoms are associated with temporal lobe epilepsy?
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Frontal Lobe
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Frontal Lobe: Outline I. Introduction III. Theory of Function IV. Effects of Damage
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I. The Frontal Lobes: General Considerations Historically, often thought of as an enigma damage rarely produced immediate and dramatic changes in sensation, perception, memory, motor function, and language However, it is now apparent that the success, timing, and appropriateness of behavioral actions depend on the integrity of the frontal lobes Frontal lobe function is now conceived of as executive function, dictating how goal-oriented behavior is controlled This includes the initiation, inhibition and elaboration of behavior In exercising executive function the individual is planning, organizing, problem solving, and executing the volitional aspects of his/her behavior Free-will versus contextual constraints Controlling the Go/No-Go aspects of behavioral flow Judgement, social feedback, emotional well-being
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I. Frontal Lobe Frontal lobe : all brain tissue anterior to central sulcus and superior to Sylvian fissure Approximately 20-30% of neocortex Major part of brain to develop last in terms of evolutionary pressures Maturation continues through adolescence Decline in function prominent in aging
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I. Frontal Lobe Development From early childhood through adolescence, the frontal lobe is still maturing and refining synaptic connections both within the frontal cortex, as well as with other cortical and subcortical brain regions For example, the Tower of London task (Figure on next slide) Similarly, emotional regulation improves with age, which is dependent on the control of impulses through inhibitory mechanisms.
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Figure 9.16 (p. 250) Figure 9.17 (p. 251)
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II. Anatomy of the Frontal Lobes All tissue anterior to central sulcus Three main subdivisions (primarily functional distinctions): Motor (primary) Premotor (“before motor”) - aka secondary motor cortex Prefrontal Cortex (“in front of the front”)
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Orbitofrontal cortex Medial Prefrontal Cortex (PFC) Motor Area Frontal lobe described in terms of planar perspectives: Basilar orbital (A) Medial (B) Dorsolateral (C) Recently, the anterior cingulate cortex has been incorporated into a general functional definition A B C Dorsolateral PFC Anterior cingulate
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Orbitofrontal cortex Medial PFC Premotor/Suppl. A
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course 830 310 taught by Professor Joannehash-converse during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lectures13_14_Frontal_S - Review Questions 1. What region...

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