Act%20Utilitarianism%20-%20A%20Closer%20Look%20%28Wilhelm%2c%20Dr.%20Utility%2c%20and%20Trolleys%29-

Act%20Utilitarianism%20-%20A%20Closer%20Look%20%28Wilhelm%2c%20Dr.%20Utility%2c%20and%20Trolleys%29-

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Medical Ethics Darin Harootunian 9/16/11 1 Review Questions and Issues 1. What is the difference between a deductive argument and a non-deductive argument? State the difference accurately and precisely. 2. What is the difference between a deductively valid argument and deductively invalid argument? State the difference accurately and precisely. Remember: Whether an argument is deductively valid or invalid has nothing to do with the actual truth values of the premises and conclusion. Think of the pretzel example. The pretzel argument has false premises and a false conclusion, but the argument is deductively valid. Whether an argument is deductively valid depends solely on whether it s logically possible for the premises to be true and the conclusion false. What do I mean by logically possible ? A logically possible proposition = defined a proposition that is logically coherent it can be imagined without contradiction, where a contradiction is of the form p&~p.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course PHIL 164 taught by Professor Doviak during the Fall '07 term at UMass (Amherst).

Ask a homework question - tutors are online