Chapter 15

Chapter 15 - Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in

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Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode (presentation mode).
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The Milky Way Galaxy Chapter 15
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This chapter plays three parts in our cosmic drama. First, it introduces the concept of a galaxy. Second, it discusses our home, the Milky Way Galaxy, a natural object of our curiosity. Third, it elaborates our story of stars by introducing us to galaxies, the communities in which stars exist. Science is based on the interaction of theory and evidence, and this chapter will show a number of examples of astronomers using evidence to test theories. If the theories seem incomplete and the evidence contradictory, we should not be disappointed. Rather, we must conclude that the adventure of discovery is not yet over. Guidepost
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We struggle to understand our own galaxy as an example. We will extend the concept of the galaxy in Chapters 16 and 17 on normal and peculiar galaxies. We will then apply our understanding of galaxies in Chapter 18 to the study of the universe as a whole. Guidepost (continued)
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I. The Nature of the Milky Way Galaxy A. The Structure of Our Galaxy B. First Studies of the Galaxy C. Discovering the Galaxy D. An Analysis of the Galaxy E. The Mass of the Galaxy II. The Origin of the Milky Way A. Stellar Populations B. The Element-Building Process C. Galactic Fountains D. The Age of the Milky Way E. The History of the Milky Way Galaxy Outline
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III. Spiral Arms A. Tracing the Spiral Arms B. Radio Maps of Spiral Arms C. The Density Wave Theory D. Star Formation in Spiral Arms IV. The Nucleus A. Observations Outline (continued)
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The Milky Way Almost everything we see in the night sky belongs to the Milky Way We see most of the Milky Way as a faint band of light across the sky From the outside, our Milky Way might look very much like our cosmic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy
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The Structure of the Milky Way (1) Disk Nuclear Bulge Halo Sun Globular Clusters
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Explorable Milky Way (SLIDESHOW MODE ONLY)
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The Structure of the Milky Way (2) Galactic Plane Galactic Center The structure is hard to determine because: 1) We are inside 2) Distance measurements are difficult 3) Our view towards the center is obscured by gas and dust
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First Studies of the Galaxy First attempt to unveil the structure of our Galaxy by William Herschel (1785), based on optical observations The shape of the Milky Way was believed to resemble a grindstone, with the sun close to the center
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Strategies to Explore the Structure of Our Milky Way I. Select bright objects that you can see throughout the Milky Way and trace their directions and distances II. Observe objects at wavelengths other than visible (to circumvent the problem of optical obscuration), and catalogue their directions and distances III. Trace the orbital velocities of objects in different directions relative to our position
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Exploring the Galaxy Using Clusters of Stars Two types of star clusters: 1) Open clusters
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Professorroberts during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Chapter 15 - Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in

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