Chapter 19

Chapter 19 - Note that the following lectures include...

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Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode (presentation mode).
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The Origin of the Solar System Chapter 19
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The preceding 18 chapters have described the origin, structure, and evolution of the physical universe, but they have neglected one important class of objects— planets. In this chapter, we can look back on what we have learned and find our place in the universe. We live on a planet. What does that mean? Where do we fit? Each time we have studied a new object, we have asked how it formed and how it evolved to its present state. We have done that with stars and galaxies and the universe, so it is appropriate to begin our discussion of the solar system by considering its origin. Another reason for discussing the origin of the solar system here is to give ourselves a framework into which we can fit the planets as we discuss them in the Guidepost
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chapters that follow. Without a theoretical framework, science is nothing but a jumble of facts. With a good framework in hand, we will be ready to make sense of the solar system through the next six chapters. Guidepost (continued)
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I. The Great Chain of Origins A. Early Hypotheses B. A Review of the Origin of Matter C. The Solar Nebula Hypothesis D. Planet-Forming Disks E. Planets Orbiting Other Stars II. A Survey of the Solar System A. Revolution and Rotation B. Two Kinds of Planets C. Space Debris D. The Age of the Solar System Outline
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III. The Story of Planet Building A. The Chemical Composition of the Solar Nebula B. The Condensation of Solids C. The Formation of Planetesimals D. The Growth of Protoplanets E. The Jovian Problem F. Explaining the Characteristics of the Solar System G. Clearing the Nebula Outline (continued)
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Early Hypotheses catastrophic hypotheses , e.g., passing star hypothesis: Star passing the sun closely tore material out of the sun, from which planets could form (no longer considered) Catastrophic hypotheses predict: Only few stars should have planets! evolutionary hypotheses , e.g., Laplace’s nebular hypothesis: Rings of material separate from the spinning cloud, carrying away angular momentum of the cloud cloud could contract further (forming the sun) Evolutionary hypotheses predict: Most stars should have planets!
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The Solar Nebula Hypothesis Basis of modern theory of planet formation. Planets form at the same time from the same cloud as the star. Sun and our Solar system formed ~ 5 billion years ago. Planet formation sites observed today as dust disks of T Tauri stars.
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Extrasolar Planets Modern theory of planet formation is evolutionary Many stars should have planets! Extrasolar planets
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Professorroberts during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Chapter 19 - Note that the following lectures include...

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