KRM Chapter 8 - Chapter 8. Lean Systems Continuous...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 8. Lean Systems Continuous Improvement Using a Lean Sys Approach Supply Chain Considerations in Lean Systems Process Considerations in Lean Systems Designing Lean System Layouts The Kanban System Value Stream Mapping House of Toyota Operational Benefits and Implementation Issues Lean Systems Lean Systems Lean systems affect a firms internal linkages between its core and supporting processes and its external linkages with its customers and suppliers. One of the most popular systems that incorporate the generic elements of lean systems is the just-in-time (JIT) system. The Japanese term for this approach is Kaizen. The key to kaizen is the understanding that excess capacity or inventory hides process problems. The goal is to eliminate the eight types of waste (muda) Overproduction Inappropriate Processing Waiting Transportation Motion Inventory Defects Underutilization of Employees. Lean, Just in Time and The Toyota Production System Pillars: just-in-time , and jidoka (Automatic line stop, Error-proofing, Visual control) Practices: setup reduction (SMED) worker training vendor relations quality control foolproofing (poka-yoke) many others Low Cost High Quality Fast Response Good & Cheap Cheap & Fast Good & Fast JIT Implementation Adopt goal to eliminate all forms of waste Improve workplace cleanliness and order Promote flow manufacturing Level production requirements Improve and standardize all process steps The role of inventory in traditional and JIT systems: The water and the rocks metaphor Material quality problems Long setups Poor training Break downs Material handling Water = Inventory The role of inventory in traditional and JIT systems: The water and the rocks metaphor Material quality problems Long setups Poor training Break downs Material handling Traditional systems use inventory (water) to buffer the process from problems (rocks) that cause disruption. The role of inventory in traditional and JIT systems: The water and the rocks metaphor Material quality problems Long setups Poor training Break downs Material handling JIT systems view inventory as waste and work to lower inventory levels to expose and correct the problems (rocks) that cause disruption. The role of inventory in traditional and JIT systems: The water and the rocks metaphor Material quality problems Long setups Poor training Break downs Material handling Lowering the level of inventory is relatively easy to...
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KRM Chapter 8 - Chapter 8. Lean Systems Continuous...

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