90 - Brabantio is crushed he is a defeated man who realizes that the Moor neither stole nor bewitched his daughter However he will never understand

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Unformatted text preview: Brabantio is crushed; he is a defeated man who realizes that the Moor neither stole nor bewitched his daughter. However, he will never understand how his "jewel" (195) renounced all his paternal guidance and secretly married a man of a different race and nation. He leaves with a parting warning to Othello: "Look to her, Moor, have a quick eye to see: / She has deceiv'd her father, may do thee." (292–293). These last words to Othello in this scene are important. They are packed with irony and provide, in part, an example of dramatic presaging. Desdemona does not deceive Othello, but before long Othello will be so convinced that she has deceived him that he will murder her. Othello's reply to Brabantio is likewise ironic: He vows, "my life upon her faith!" (295). Shortly, he will take his own life because of his lack of faith in her faith — in her innocent, chaste fidelity.because of his lack of faith in her faith — in her innocent, chaste fidelity....
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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