104 -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Desdemona realizes that Othello's answer is curt, and she emphasizes that this is an important  matter and not a trifle that she is asking. To this, Othello stresses again that he will deny her nothing,  but, in return, he asks for a bit of time so that he can be alone; he will join her shortly. As Desdemona leaves, Othello chides himself for being irritated by his wife. Lovingly he sighs,  "Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul, / But I do love thee! and when I love thee not, / Chaos is  come again" (90–92). There is an element of prophecy here not only in Desdemona's and Othello's  farewells to one another, but also in their lines and in the remainder of the Moor's first speech after  Desdemona leaves. In a metaphorical sense, perdition will soon catch Othello's soul, and chaos will  soon replace order in his life. When Iago is alone with Othello, he resumes his attack on his general's soul. Out of seemingly idle 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online