4 - Faulkner did not number the sections since he was...

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Unformatted text preview: Faulkner did not number the sections since he was interested in creating a continuous impression; therefore, the following attempt to divide the novel into sections and groups is made so as to facilitate critical commentary. Faulkner's technique throughout the novel is to present short individual sections in which some character gives his thoughts about the events that are taking place. Each section is an "interior monologue," an attempt to reproduce what the character might be actually thinking. Therefore, if the character is in the presence of other people, often his thoughts will be interrupted by the conversation and often the character will record that conversation before continuing with his line of thinking. In its largest view, the novel will concern itself with the death of Addie Bundren and the long arduous journey that the family undertakes in order to bury her in Jefferson, a town forty miles away. In these journey that the family undertakes in order to bury her in Jefferson, a town forty miles away....
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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