23 - Bravery.,Scoutsays"Jem'sheadattimeswas transparent:' orform,"Asnotedbefore,theconceptof braveryisveryimpor

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Bravery.  When Jem creates the Boo Radley game, Scout says, "Jem's head at times was  transparent: he had thought that up to make me understand he wasn't afraid of Radleys in any shape  or form, to contrast his own fearless heroism with my cowardice." As noted before, the concept of  bravery is very important to Jem, and he cultivates it as much as he can. He has moved from weakly  accepting a dare to touch the Radley house to retrieving a tire from the Radley yard to creating a  game in which the children take on the personas of various Radley family members. Jem's bravery increases when he and Dill decide to deliver the note to Boo. Scout, though, comically  points out that Jem is not quite as brave as he fancies himself to be when she exclaims, "'Anybody  who's brave enough to go up and touch the house hadn't oughta use a fishin' pole, . . . Why don't 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online