80 - The stress of a word follows two simple rules....

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Unformatted text preview: The stress of a word follows two simple rules. Understanding them is imperative for pronouncing words and understanding why written accent marks are sometimes necessary: If a word ends in any consonant other than n or s, the natural stress will be on the last syllable. If a word ends in a vowel or the letter n or s, the natural stress is on the next-to-last syllable. Accent marks may seem to be randomly placed in a word, but there are actually very easy rules to explain why they are used. The three basic rules to remember are: There is only one kind of accent. There is only one accent in any word. An accent can be placed only on a vowel, never a consonant. The main purpose of writing an accent mark is to indicate that this particular word is supposed to be stressed somewhere other than the syllable where it would be stressed naturally if it followed the...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course SPAN 101 taught by Professor Oliveros during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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80 - The stress of a word follows two simple rules....

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