Database Management and Development _advance_

Database Management - Database Management and Development Supplemental package posted on Sakai Data and Information Management Data is the basic

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Database Management and Development Supplemental package posted on Sakai
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Data and Information Management Data is the basic building block of information and knowledge Data management must be efficient and effective Data must be accessible
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Traditional File Systems Each department or business unit would have its own file systems The same data or facts could appear on many different file systems within the organization Data structure and Accounting Engineering Marketing
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Traditional File Systems Problems Data redundancy Leads to data inconsistency, anomalies and other data integrity problems Data and structural dependence Requires extensive programming to add or delete a field, change the data type within a field, etc. Inadequate analytic capabilities Excessive programming requirements
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The Database Approach A database is A shared, integrated repository It houses end-user’s data and metadata (data about the data) Database Management System (DBMS) is a collection of programs that manages database structure and controls access to the data Examples are MS Access, MS SQL Server, Oracle, IBM DB2
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The Database Approach All data is stored in a common database Each department or business unit has its own programs for data processing Programs and users access the Database DBMS Accounting Engineering Marketing
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Database Models A database model is used to represent the data structure and the data relationships within the database
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Data relationships One-to-many relationships Example: A painter may paint many paintings, but each painting is only painted by one painter Many-to-many relationships Example: A student may take many courses and each course can be taken by many students One-to-one relationships Example: A salesperson is assigned to a company car
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Evolution of database models Hierarchical model Relationships between the data must fit an upside-down “tree” or “parent-child” structure. Data can only have one-to-many relationships Data must always be retrieved from the top down Not flexible
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Evolution of database models Network Model Allows “child” to have more than one “parent” More flexible than the hierarchical model but difficult to design and use properly Very complex for programming
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Evolution of database models Relational Model Developed by E.F. Cobb in 1970 (IBM) It revolutionized database design and practice Conceptually simple Easy for end users to construct queries and retrieve data on an ad-hoc basis
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Relational database model The database is a collection of tables or relations Each column in the table is a field or attribute Each row in the table is a record StudentI D LName FName Email 3456789 Lin Rose rlin 0123456 Hewitt David dhewitt 7890123 Sana Vik vsana Table Name: Student Fields Records
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Relational database model Primary Keys
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2011 for the course ITIS ITIS1p97 taught by Professor Dr.susansproule during the Fall '11 term at Brock University, Canada.

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Database Management - Database Management and Development Supplemental package posted on Sakai Data and Information Management Data is the basic

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