MDcalc_Diff_2 - Multidimensional Calculus: Differential...

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Unformatted text preview: Multidimensional Calculus: Differential Theory Chapter & Page: 9–9 Final Comments on Christoffel Symbols and Acceleration Using the above, we can find formulas for acceleration (and Christoffel symbols) in Euclidean spaces and in nonEuclidean subpaces contained in Euclidean spaces (e.g., curves and spheres in Euclidean three-space), at least when the coordinates on the subspace are a subset of the coordinates of the coordinates of the larger Euclidean space. If we had time to develop the metric tensor, we would also be able to obtain another formula for the Christoffel symbols that would allow us to compute these quantities without referring back to some Cartesian system. This formula also applies in nonEuclidean spaces, and allows us to find formulas for acceleration in those spaces, again, without recourse to any Cartesian system. 9.2 Scalar and Vector Fields Basic Definitions and Concepts In the following, all points/positions refer to points in some N-dimensional space S . A scalar field Ψ (on S ) is a scalar-valued function of position, Ψ ( x ) = some scalar value corresponding to position x in S . Some examples: T ( x ) = temperature at position x , Φ( x ) = the gravitational potential at x due to the surrounding masses , x 2 ( x ) = the second coordinate of x with respect to some given coordinate system and r ( x ) = distance between x and some fixed point O (i.e., r ( x ) = dist ( x , O ) ) . The coordinate formula for a scalar field Ψ with respect to a given coordinate system { ( x 1 , x 2 , . . . , x N ) } is just the formula ψ( x 1 , x 2 , . . . , x N ) for computing the value of Ψ ( x ) from the coordinates for x . So Ψ ( x ) = ψ( x 1 , x 2 , . . . , x N ) with x ∼ ( x 1 , x 2 , . . . , x N ) . For example, if our space is a plane and we are using Cartesian coordinates { ( x , y ) } with O as the origin, then the coordinate formula for r ( x ) = dist ( x , O ) is radicalbig x 2 + y 2 . If, instead, we are using polar coordinates { (ρ, φ) } with O as the origin, then the coordinate formula for r ( x ) = dist ( x , O ) is ρ ....
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course MA 607 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '11 term at University of Alabama in Huntsville.

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MDcalc_Diff_2 - Multidimensional Calculus: Differential...

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