lecture_3 - Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct...

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Membrane transport and Cell Signaling Passive vs. active transport Types of cell signaling Receptors
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Cell membranes Lipid bilayer Associated proteins Heterogeneous Fig. 3.20/ 2.43 Fig. 3.24/ 2.47 Fig. 3.22/ 2.45
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Membrane transport Passive diffusion Facilitated diffusion Fig. 3.20
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Membrane transport Passive diffusion Facilitated diffusion Ion channels Porins (e.g., aquaporins) Permeases Fig. 3.26/ 2.49 Fig. 3.25/ 2.48 Passive transport
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Membrane transport Active transport Primary active transport Transport of solute is linked to splitting of ATP E.g., sodium pump
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Membrane transport Active transport Primary active transport Secondary active transport Uses gradient set up by primary active transport Symport and antiport Fig. 3.28
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General principles of cell signaling Signaling cell and target cell Signal is typically chemical messenger Signal can be an electric pulse (for at least part of the distance) Chemical messenger binds to a protein receptor Binding to receptor leads to response, i.e., signal transduction pathway
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Unformatted text preview: Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct cell signaling via gap junctions Fig. 4.2/ 3.2 Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct cell signaling via gap junctions Autocrine/paracrine signaling Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct cell signaling via gap junctions Autocrine/paracrine signaling Endocrine signaling Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct cell signaling via gap junctions Autocrine/paracrine signaling Endocrine signaling Neural signaling Receptors Receptors are proteins Receptors bind to ligands Natural ligand Agonist Antagonist Fig. 4.6/ 3.11 Saturation of receptors Fig. 4.7/ 3.12 Fig. 4.8/ 3.13 Affinity of receptors Fig. 4.8/ 3.13 Receptors and cell signaling Receptors determine which cells are target cells Ligand binding induces conformational change in receptor Change in shape leads to signal transduction pathways and amplification Fig. 4.9/ 3.15...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course BISC 305 taught by Professor Christians during the Fall '11 term at Simon Fraser.

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lecture_3 - Types of cell signaling Fig. 4.1/ 3.1 Direct...

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