Lecture_20 - • Thick filaments – Myosin • Thin filaments – Actin – Troponin – Tropomyosin Fig 6.14 5.12 Fig 6.18 Sarcomeres • Thick

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Muscles Cytoskeleton Actin and myosin Thick and thin filaments Sarcomeres
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Central vs. peripheral nervous systems Fig. 8.1/ 7.1
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Cytoskeleton Microfilaments (actin) Microtubules (tubulin) Intermediate filaments Fig. 3.31/ 2.53
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Cytoskeleton Microfilaments (actin) Microtubules (tubulin) Intermediate filaments Motor proteins Myosin (actin) Kinesin and dynein (microtubules) Fig. 5.16/ 4.16
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Microfilament structure G-actin F-actin Fig. 6.10/ 5.9
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Sliding filament model Myosin is an ATPase – converts energy from ATP into mechanical energy Myosin moves relative to actin Sliding filament model (see Fig. 6.15/5.13) Fig. 6.14 / 5.12
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Myosin There are at least 17 different classes of myosins Myosin II = muscle myosin Myosin light chains are regulated by reversible phosphorylation There are multiple isoforms of myosin II Fig. 6.14/ 5.12
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Muscles Muscle cells = myocytes Uses of muscles: Locomotion Circulatory system Respiratory system Digestive system Striated vs. smooth muscle Fig. 6.17/ 5.16
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Thick vs. thin filaments
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Unformatted text preview: • Thick filaments – Myosin • Thin filaments – Actin – Troponin – Tropomyosin Fig. 6.14/ 5.12 Fig. 6.18/ Sarcomeres • Thick and thin filaments are arranged into sarcomeres Fig. 6.17/ 5.16 Fig. 6.19/ 5.17 Sarcomeres • Thick and thin filaments are arranged into sarcomeres Fig. 6.20/ 5.18 Sarcomeres • Force generated by muscles depends on overlap between thick and thin filaments Fig. 6.21/ 5.19 Muscle structure • Myofibril: continuous stretch of sarcomeres • Myofibrils are arranged in – Myofibers – Cardiomyocytes Fig. 6.22/ 5.20 Excitation contraction coupling • Depolarization • Rise in intracellular [Ca 2+ ] • Ca 2+ causes troponin and tropomyosin to move, allowing myosin to bind to actin • Muscle contraction • Muscles vary in terms of – mechanism of the depolarization – pattern of membrane potential over time – propagation of the depolarization along the sarcolemma – source of Ca 2+ Fig. 6.18/ 5.15...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2011 for the course BISC 305 taught by Professor Christians during the Fall '11 term at Simon Fraser.

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Lecture_20 - • Thick filaments – Myosin • Thin filaments – Actin – Troponin – Tropomyosin Fig 6.14 5.12 Fig 6.18 Sarcomeres • Thick

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